z STANDARD GROUP PARTNERS WITH CURE IN "A NIGHT TO SHINE"
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  •  A NIGHT TO SHINE

    A NIGHT TO SHINE

  •  Gospel Artist Mr Seed crowns Samuel Njenga of Joy Town schooL

    Gospel Artist Mr Seed crowns Samuel Njenga of Joy Town schooL

  •  A NIGHT TO SHINE

    A NIGHT TO SHINE

  •  Gospel Artist Moji Short Baba gives Monicah Wanjiru, 14years, of Joy Town school, Thika, as early Valentine during the 5th edition of Night to shine at AIC-Cure International hospital

    Gospel Artist Moji Short Baba gives Monicah Wanjiru, 14years, of Joy Town school, Thika, as early Valentine during the 5th edition of Night to shine at AIC-Cure International hospital

STANDARD GROUP PARTNERS WITH CURE IN "A NIGHT TO SHINE"

AIC CURE International Hospital in Kijabe celebrated differently-abled children with an event dubbed A Night to Shine, which was started by American Tim Tebow to show love to children with various kinds of disabilities. It is celebrated in 34 countries globally every year in February. The event, which was sponsored by Standard Group PLC for the third year now saw children being pampered, showered with flowers and crowned as 'Kings' or 'Queens' by celebrities who graced the event.

Standard Group Corporate Affairs Manager Naomi Kosgei said the media house is keen on supporting the disabled.

“We are looking forward to working with Cure International and other organizations. We have gotten people calling with the desire to support children with disabilities, and we call upon other partners to join us to give these special people necessary devices and rehabilitation,” said Ms Kosgei.

Nelson Muoki, the Development Manager at the hospital said many parents keep their disabled children at homes, hence missing out on rehabilitation services, some of which are free.

Rehabilitation efforts

“We have rehabilitation services. We normally have mobile clinics in various counties yearly. The fact that some parents hide their children at home makes it hard for us to reach them. Bring them out to us even if you do not have money. We will treat them,” said Muoki.

Dickson Mwirigi, an occupational therapist with the Cerebral Palsy Society of Kenya also said late identification of children with disabilities is a barrier to rehabilitation efforts.

“The challenge we have is late identification of children with cerebral palsy. The condition should be identified at birth and intervention made in good time. Late identification delays the intervention exercise, which makes them exhaust the oxygen they have, causing them more problems,” he said.

Mr Mwirigi asked the government to reduce the cost of wheelchairs. Stating that a hand-driven wheelchair costs about Sh24,000, yet it is locally made by the Association for the Physically Disabled of Kenya with support from the government.